15 Minutes with Bill. My tale of photographing a screen icon.

William Shatner is best known for his role as Captain James T Kirk on the Starship Enterprise. I’ve had the honour and pleasure of having him in front of my lens on two occasions. In total my time spent photographing him has equated to 15 minutes. 15 minutes with Bill.

Being an ardent Star Trek fan, as well as prolific portrait photographer with a strong reputation for icons of stage and screen, this short time with the screen legend has amounted to an extraordinary experience. Yes, I’m just a little star struck.

To meet one of your childhood heroes can be both awe-inspiring and utterly terrifying at the same time. Now try operating a camera under the pressure!

William Shatner Portrait Rory Lewis Photographer Los Angeles, Portrait Photographer

Where it All Began

My first sitting with William Shatner was back on 12th February 2015. At the time, I was travelling to LA and wanted to take the opportunity to include Shatner in my Expressive Portraits exhibition.

Prior to my LA trip I had written to Shatner expressing my wish to include him in the project. I must admit it was a stab in the dark. Nonetheless, the reply came that he would do me the honour of accepting my invitation.

In preparation for the shoot, I arrived at Shatner’s office at 10am feeling a mixture of nerves, apprehension, and barely-concealed excitement. As I approached the window I could see a large looming figure behind the blinds. It was him. There, right before me stood one of my childhood ‘greats’. Gulp.

The door was opened by Kathleen, Mr Shatner’s PA, who kindly informed me I had just 10 minutes to set up and 5 minutes to shoot as he was due to take a flight. No pressure then! I couldn’t let my nerves get the better of me, but how to shoot a living legend in just 5 minutes?

Fortunately experience prevailed and I was ready and waiting as Bill entered to take his seat on the stool. In my mind’s eye, he was, until this point, a flamboyant character. As I took a deep breath and introduced myself I realised I was completely wrong. Rather than brash and larger than life, Shatner is a very quietly spoken man of only a few words.

As a portraitist, I have learned to separate the individual’s character as an actor from the characters they have played. In the interests of simplicity (bearing in mind the 5 minutes’ window) I opted straight for this method. However, my initial direction didn’t receive the response I’d hoped for. My request for a plain expression was met with “I don’t do plain!” I quickly took the opportunity to explain my reasoning: that as a character actor the viewer needed a blank canvas, an expressionless person, on which to hang their own thoughts. No good, no bad, no love, no hate, no character, just an opportunity to view and assume. In my experience, it is this essence which makes an image thought-provoking and memorable.

With my explanation, Bill became more amiable. Deep breath again, using the word “emotionless” in preference to “plain”, this time he agreed. Mr Shatner took his own breath, closed his eyes, and then looked up directly in to the lens, clearly having cleared his mind of thought or question.

I clicked. The result was my first thought-provoking portrait of William Shatner. In 5 minutes, magic had been created.

William Shatner Portrait Rory Lewis Photographer Los Angeles, Portrait Photographer

 

Second Time, Double Time

The second time I photographed Shatner was when I returned to LA in April 2016. Once more I got in touch to arrange a sitting. I had so much more I wanted to explore in the subject that is William Shatner. I was truly delighted to learn of his acceptance. Even more, Shatner himself was ecstatic with my first efforts. I’d done it, in just 5 minutes!

The sitting took place on 4th April 2016. Once again, I turned up at the office to be greeted by Mr Shatner’s assistant. This time I met a more relaxed Shatner with nowhere to go, and a little more time on his hands. He was more casually dressed, wearing a black shirt as I had requested, and was available for the double the previous five minutes.

Preparation for a Portrait Sitting

Before any sitting I always spend time planning. This ‘behind the scenes’ time is invaluable for the ultimate portrait. In the case of Shatner I spent hours looking at material from both films and television programmes, as well as reviewing and assessing the other available portraits of Bill to date. There was a common theme running through 99% of them: Bill as the hero.

Speaking about this type casting, Bill has quipped: “I always play the hero and always get the girl.” To make a portrait of Bill that was different and unique I wanted to draw him out of his comfort zone. I wanted to polarise him away from the ‘hero’ and instead get him in the camp of the villain.

Take Robin Williams for example: a face well-documented in comedy and farce. Yet, when he was given the creepy and darker character named Sy in the psychological thriller One Hour Photo, we saw something utterly new, unnerving and compelling.

This became my impetus for the sitting with Shatner. I wanted this to be about Shatner the ‘bad guy’. I took the time to explain my reasoning and idea to Bill and he was very happy and compliant to give it a go.

The Portrait Sitting

In directing the screen icon, I drew on Shakespeare. I asked Bill to think about a Shakespearian villain and to assume this as his muse. This enticed Bill to gaze leeringly in to the lens as we transformed the heroic Shatner in to the evil alter-ego.

After 10 minutes, my sitting with Shatner came to an end. In total, I had experienced 15 minutes with one of my absolute screen heroes in front of my lens.

Lessons Learned

To direct an actor who, you have admired for many years is an incredible opportunity. Photography is about so much more than merely clicking the shutter and getting some lighting tricks right. Successful photography, and successful portraiture, is about evoking a feeling. This process is impossible without direction. Direction is key.

 

Below is the list of all the equipment I used on both occasions. 

First sitting with a white backdrop.

  1. Bowens 750 Pro Flash Head 
  1. Calumet 43″ (109cm) Satin White/Silver Compact Umbrella 
  1. Profoto 80cm Reflector – Black/White 
  1. Calumet Arctic White 1.35m x 11m Seamless Background Paper 
  1. Calumet Posing Stool 
  1. Calumet 107 cm 4 Colour Zip Disc Cover Gold/White/Silver/Black 
  1. Mamiya Leaf Credo 40 System + Phase One XF Camera + Prism Viewfinder + 80mm LS Lens 

Second sitting with black backdrop

  1. X2 Calumet 107 cm 4 Colour Zip Disc Cover Gold/White/Silver/Black 
  1. Mamiya Leaf Credo 40 System + Phase One XF Camera + Prism Viewfinder + 80mm LS Lens 
  2. Lastolite 1.5mx1.8m Collapsible Reversible Background – Black/White 
  1. Profoto B2 250 AirTTL To-Go Kit
  2. Calumet 43″ (109cm) Satin White/Silver Compact Umbrella

 

If you’d like to master your portraiture skills with Rory, check out the seminars he’s running at Calumet Academy.

 

 

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